Crossing the border

We left Tok, Alaska and headed out into the cold towards Haines, with Martin's knees still feeling bad we took it slowly, with the wind against us the entire way. Along the way there were incredible views of the Tananar river and the roads were really up and down with hardly any traffic, the silence out there is quite amazing, if you stop for a moment you realize how far from everything you are, trees and mountains fill the entire horizon. We saw our first piece of wildlife, a baby Caribou in the road!

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We stopped for the night about 50 miles down the road and setup our tent in 4ft of snow, which involved compressing the snow down by stomping around on it like some weird dance. After attempting a fire and sort of succeeding but being too tired to enjoy it we went to bed. Waking up it was apparent that it was snowing, with a new roof on our tent we went outside in a snowstorm and attempted to make breakfast. The stove we are using is secondhand and in the rush of leaving we hadn't had time to test it out, up until this point we had been using gas canisters, but the last of our canisters had just run out. It was time to test out using liquid fuel with our stove, reading the instructions in a snow storm we tried to get it going but it kept leaking fuel. With a non-functioning stove we were in trouble, we needed the stove to make us warm meals after a long day in the Alaskan springtime and more importantly to melt snow for drinking water. We set off after a cold breakfast and packing our bikes up, the snow kept coming all morning and our feet were frozen before we even left, usually they are frozen at the end of the day not the beginning.

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Snow storm out of sight we stopped for lunch by the side of the road, while looking a bit cold and eating our usual fare of peanut butter and bread a couple pulled up and asked where we are cycling to and how everything was going. We talked to Pam and Cameron, a couple from Whitehorse, Canada about our trip and then we told them about our stove troubles and asked if there was somewhere up ahead where we could get a new one, they immediately offered us their stove from the back of their car, this was a complete life saver, thank you so much Pam & Cameron!

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With our spirits lifted we cycled on to Border City, a small stop a few miles from the Canadian border. We sat in the bar there with a few locals and checked emails and drank root beer. At some point in the evening one of the people who worked there showed us a photograph of a wolf who had been spotted wondering around outside, it just happened that the wolf was standing almost exactly where we had pitched our tent. Putting thoughts of wolfs and other enormous scary animals aside we cooked dinner on our donated stove and went to sleep.

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In the morning we headed down the road to a the Canadian border and our final destination for the day, Beaver Creek, Canada. In our minds Beaver Creek was this huge town filled with shops and things to do, after not seeing anything larger than a petrol station for 600 miles your imagination can get ahead of itself. Crossing over the Canadian border (first time in Canada, woohoo!) we cycled into a really small overcast town, Beaver Creek. We pitched our tent at an RV site come Petrol station and went out to find signs of life in the local bar. We spent the evening playing american pool and being bought a lot of drinks by the locals. Stumbling home we got to sleep and woke up the next day a bit too late and hungover to leave so we decided to stay another day. We washed our clothes for the first time in 2 weeks and ate overpriced snacks from the petrol station, living the dream.

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Location

Beaver Creek, Canada

Date

03 May, 2013